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Sermons

Sun, Jul 23, 2017

Being Angry with God

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54 mins 6 secs
Being angry with God is a reality for some believers. But, where does this anger come from and what are we supposed to do with it? The life of Naomi from the Book of Ruth will help our attempt to answer these questions.
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Being angry with God is a reality for some believers. But, where does this anger come from and what are we supposed to do with it? The life of Naomi from the Book of Ruth will help our attempt to answer these questions. From Ruth 1:1-5, we discover the first of the reasons why people are angry with God, namely, bad and uncomfortable circumstances in their lives. In Ruth 1:19-22, we find a second reason, namely, the fact that life is not fair. Indeed, life on earth is rarely fair. From what we can tell, there is no reason or logic given in Ruth Chapter 1 for any of the tragedies that befell Naomi and her family. A third reason for our fury with God comes from broken expectations. We expect that God will work things so we are happy but when life turns out to be beet juice instead of lemonade we get furious at the God who is supposed to be running the whole show like some kind of expert. There are a number of problems with being angry with God. The first is that by it, we seek to absolve ourselves of every responsibility for our lives. Second, the argument that God should have prevented the problems that we face because He has the power to do so fails to acknowledge that God has a preferred way of working. He did not prevent the suffering and death of His Son but He raised Him from the dead. Third, we can get so furious or resentful or disappointed that we turn away from God completely. At that point, our eternal soul is in jeopardy. When we stop praying, stop going to church, stop reading the Bible, and we harbor nothing but ill-will towards God in our hearts we are in danger of eternally rejecting God. How, then, are we to handle it when we are angry with God? Before we go into this, we need to state that being angry with God is because of not being able to see our situation from God’s perspective; we really do not have any tangible reason why God would allow us to experience what happened to us. The story of Naomi of Bethlehem is not one that stays rooted in bitterness and anger with God, and from Ruth 2:19-23 we can discover what we are to do when we are bitter, angry, and furious with God. In the course of Naomi’s story, her daughter-in-law Ruth ended up in the field of a man named Boaz. He was a godly man who was well respected (Ruth 2:4). He took notice of Ruth and protected her, provided for her during the workday, and directed his harvesters to treat her well (Ruth 2:5-18). This was such a blessing and it was acknowledged by Naomi in verse 20. First, she asked for God to bless Boaz. Secondly, she said that God had not stopped showing His kindness to the living and the dead. Naomi saw that God was working in the situation with Ruth and Boaz. Naomi’s statement leads us to two truths that we must keep in mind, as we are angry and furious with God. First in verse 20, Naomi kept her eyes and heart open so that when God did something, she could see it. Second in verse 20, Naomi understood that in all things, God is good and He works for our good in the midst of whatever happens in our lives. Third, in Ruth 4:13-16 we learn from the kind words the women of Bethlehem that God at His very core is a redeemer and a renewer. Circumstances in our lives can dash our world to pieces, but God can redeem any situation that we find ourselves in for His good and for our good.
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